Tag Archive | CPU alumni

Let’s Hear Them – CPU Janitorial Work Students 2008 Mini-Documentary

This is a 10-minute documentary of the CPU work students that the Office of the President produced in 2007.

The work students who were interviewed in this video are probably professionals now and perhaps achieving well in their chosen careers.

May students and alumni draw inspiration from the lives of these work students.

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President Robles Answers Open Letter from Concerned Alumnus

Centralians, here’s the reply of President Robles to the Open Letter to CPU President Robles from Concerned Alumnus.

June 10, 2014

Dear Dr. Ruiz,

Thank you for your email. I have not received any email from you for the last 12 months at least. It is your right to release your email with or without my reply. It appears that information coming from the Philippines are either incomplete or distorted.

On the Diesto case, CPU has been banking with Allied Bank/PNB long before I became president. Nelson is blaming the university for the loss of 2000 pesos in his ATM account and even accusing the university of conniving with the bank. The security of his ATM card is his responsibility. According to the bank’s record and the CCTV recording, a woman was standing in front of the ATM machine at the time the withdrawal was made. The university can’t be responsible for the security of the ATM card of all employees. The person who withdrew the amount knew the pin number of Nelson’s ATM card. The suspension would have been canceled if he apologized to the university. Please read his so called apology and you will know why it is not an apology.

Regarding transparency issues. All transactions are audited internally and also by an external auditor. The internal auditor and accountant visits university projects to make sure that everything is in order. The business office has complete financial records on donations, grants, etc and all disbursements are properly recorded and follow strictly the university guidelines. The BOT receive regular reports on the activities of the administration.

Some people think that I stole money from the university to build my house. They are forgetting that my wife and I worked in the U.S for more than 35 years and we sold our house in Wisconsin before the housing market fell.

The research projects funded by DOST and DA are progressing as expected and have supported the research work of three faculty members and several 4th year students. There developments that will greatly enhance native chicken production. Several LGUs and even DSWD are developing livelihood projects for their constituents with the support of our native chicken project. We are helping the poor not bribing them. For the first time in the history of CPU we harvested 758 sacks of rice in Zarraga farm even though some areas were affected by typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda). Thanks to the dedication of some of our faculty especially in the College of Agriculture. Our research projects are geared towards commercialization and technology transfer to the farmers. There will be more discoveries to make because of the original research grant and the continuing support of DOST, DA and CPU.

Alumni donations made it possible for CPU to provide fishing boats and accessories to 25 beneficiaries. One alumna donated 25 fishing boats. Alumni from Agriculture and students from Business and Accountancy donated more than 20 fishing boats to another village.

The research and publication (International journal) entry of the dean of CARES was the 2013 national winner of the CHED REPUBLICA Award. Qualifiers were from UP, Dilliman, UP, Los Banos, UST, Ateneo de Manila, Ateneo de Davao, De LaSalle and USC.

Thanks for your interest in the developments at CPU. To God be the Glory!

Ted

Teodoro C. Robles, PhD
President
Central Philippine University

Open Letter to CPU President Robles from Concerned Alumnus

We picked up from The Good Old Days at CPU Facebook Page the letter that Dr. Lester Edwin J. Ruiz wrote to CPU President Teodoro Robles.

Please read the full text of the letter below:

June 9, 2014

Dear President Robles,

I trust this email to you, only my third in the past five or six years, finds you well and in good health.

Allow me to comment directly on the brief exchange between Ms. St. Denis and yourself regarding the CPU “chicken project” in Leon. I thought myself that Ms. St. Denis’ question on Facebook was pretty clear, she seemed to be asking about the transparency that a university—any university that is genuinely concerned about all its constituencies—should exercise towards its constituencies, including its alumni/ae. Many of us are familiar with the university’s obligation to be accountable to the Philippine government. Some of us work with national and international donor agencies, as well as government-recognized accrediting agencies. So we know that a certain kind of accountability is required in order to receive project funding.

But, the question, Mr. President, is less about accountability to government, and much more about the transparency and accountability towards alumni/ae—and to the internal constituencies of the university (i.e., faculty, administration, students). I believe we deserve the courtesy of a substantive response.

I myself welcome your invitation to seek the truth. Your offer to make the university’s internal records available to anyone who is seeking the truth is encouraging. Your invitation to alumni/ae to visit and to see for themselves what is going on is re-assuring. Where documentary evidence is concerned, we all know that alumni/ae for the longest time have already asked for these records, not only with regard to the “chicken” project, but also in other areas of university life, for example, student scholarships, infrastructure projects, and others. Sadly, none to my knowledge have been forthcoming. This is an old refrain that sometimes sounds like a broken record. But, you know as well as I that this constant request for information is part of the structure and process of transparency, accountability, and good governance. What I have seen thus far have been largely public relations reports: what I call “narrative evidence” (or “stories” from administration). The question, however, is about “documentary evidence,” maybe even “statutory evidence,” that describes the structure, process, and criteria by which the university undertakes, implements, and demonstrates its conformity not only to the legal requirements of government, but also the desirable expectations of good governance, including what mechanisms of independent accounting, audit, budget, and control are used and their results.

If the only reports we as alumni/ae deserve are the ones the university has released thus far, then so be it. But please, do not invite us to seek the truth, and not provide us with what is needed to arrive at that truth, including the free exchange of information and ideas, the right and obligation to ask difficult questions—without censure or insult, and the unqualified welcome of alumni/ae who request such information (some even visit CPU and you).

Facebook, for me, is not, in the first instance, a source of data or information. It is a “weather station” that indicates how the (social, political, institutional) winds are blowing, reflecting the sentiments of part of the university’s constituencies. I may or may not believe what I read on Facebook. But I take seriously what it reflects, namely, a deep concern by some alumni/ae regarding the way the university is being run. I work with 270 seminaries, divinity schools, and graduate schools of theology in the US and Canada; and probably tens of hundreds more in other parts of the world. So, I have a little bit of understanding of the challenges universities face with regard to its constituencies. In fact, whether you believe it or not, I can appreciate the challenges you face, including the frustration that comes with what feels is endless, unwarranted, even uninformed, criticism. At the same time, Mr. President, these alumni/ae are only exercising their care and concern for their Alma Mater. I believe they deserve a much deeper and broader response than what I have seen thus far.

I myself wrote you several emails in the past few years but never got a response from you. Maybe, these emails did not reach you; or maybe, you chose to ignore them. I really don’t know. And frankly speaking, there is a sense in which it does not matter if you respond or not. Truth be told, I don’t hold it against you; nor did I expect a response. But the other alumni/ae, such as those on FB are expecting their questions to be addressed directly and explicitly by you or by your duly appointed representatives. And while you may think that you have done that, the fact that they have kept asking—in all kinds of fora, including Facebook—means, their questions have yet to be fully answered. This probably means, your alumni/ae office needs to review how effective it is engaging its constituencies.

So why do I write now, and why publicly? There are several reasons. First, because I hope that should you wish to respond, as you did in the case of Ms. St. Denis, you would do so publicly. Second, because I am one of those who has been asking the university for transparency and accountability—not just from the office of the president, but from the entire university; and not just in the case of the “chicken” project, or the Nelson Diesto suspension, or student scholarships, but in all areas of the university’s life and work. More important, this insistence on transparency and accountability is not just for their own sake, but for the sake of institutional vitality and educational effectiveness. The mission of CPU demands a commitment to quality assurance and improvement, or in my language, to transformation: the “creation of the fundamentally new that is also fundamentally better.” And in this, all constituencies have a part to play, and therefore, need to be in the conversation.

Mine is not a new concern; it has been a longstanding one. And it feels that there has been uneven movement in the area of transparency, accountability and transformation in relation to alumni/ae. Let me be very clear, Mr. President. I am not blaming or accusing you for not doing your job. A university president’s performance review is the proper venue and obligation of the Board of Trustees—not of alumni/ae on Facebook. What I am saying, however, is that these important exchanges, even criticism, is part of our “life together” as Centralians, as members of civil society, and as sisters and brothers in the commonwealth of God—and in these public spaces, the winds are blowing, and they will continue to blow, perhaps even harder, until they are met with candor and compassion, understanding and grace—which is part of the exercise of true leadership and Christian discipleship.

Thank you for your service to CPU. I hope for better days.

Yours sincerely,

Lester Edwin J. Ruiz, PhD
HS Class 1971
2012-2013 Visiting Associate Professor
College of Theology
Central Philippine University

CLICK to read the CPU President’s response

Congratulations CPU Graduates!

To the graduates by Cyrus Natividad

Congratulations graduates of Central Philippine University SY 2013-2104.

7th CPUAA Global Reunion at Sydney – First Day Glimpse

There was much joy and jubilation among Centralians attending the 7th CPUAA Global Reunion at Sydney. The event started yesterday, 9 September 2012.

Let us get a glimpse of what happened on the first day through the message that Ismael Isidto, CPUAA Australia Chapter President on the Sydney Global Reunion Facebook page.

We’re happy to share these pictures that Jude Batuigas took and shared in her Facebook account.

Jude Batuigas is alumna of high school (1991) and nursing (1995) departments of Central Philippine University. At present, she works and lives in Sydney with her family.

 
Mabuhay CPUAA Australia Chapter!

Tradition and Innovation from a Central Philippine University Artist's "Paint of View"

By Lucell Larawan

Central Philippine University Blog

Among the highlights of the national arts month is the Philippine Visual Arts Festival: The Rizal Experience (PIVAF: TRE) at Angono, Rizal.

This is the main event for sculptors, painters and cultural workers. I am among the five delegates in Panay, representing Iloilo.

My painting entry entitled “Kambal na Tradisyon at Inobasyon Tungo sa mas Matibay na Pagkakakilanlan” is my interpretation of this year’s theme. It shows that both tradition and innovation are Siamese twins where one animates the other.

Tradition is the treasure trove of indigenous wisdom, without which communities cannot establish a unique identity that they can call their own. Innovations are indications of growth needed for a stronger and more mature culture.

Cultures doe not have to stagnate; they should soar. As they evolve, people should have a stronger identity needed for a better sense of pride. Such sense of pride is mediated by an intervening variable—symbols of excellence.

People who develop a better sense of pride are liberated from a psychic malady called Doña Victorina syndrome or self-contempt (common among Filipinos) and become more prepared as building blocks of national development.

My painting shown here is more particular about the Iloilo milieu. Some reminisce our Carabao-Carroza festival, Pinta Paraw and the distant past where the barter of Panay used the salakot medium. We can also take pride of original inventions by two Central Philippine University professors: the single-burner rice husk stove of Alexis Belonio and the pellet mill by Jaime Cabarles and associates.

In a state of flux, our culture continually establishes a stronger distinction developing among the Filipino subcultures.

The approach used as I limned this in acrylic is a synthesis of modern styles. The composition embraces the tradition of breaking traditions when it comes to canons of art making.
_________________________

ABOUT LUCELL LARAWAN

Central Philippine University Blog

Lucell Larawan is an Associate Professor of the Department of Business Administration, Central Philippine University. As a prolific researcher, he completed eight single-authored researches on business and management, and art.

He presented papers in the “International Conference on Business and Management” in Turkey (April 15-17, 2011) and the “First International Conference on Visayan Art and Culture” (SM Trade Center, Cebu City, 2010).

Lucell will be presenting two papers in June 2012, one in the UP National College of Public Administration and Governance International Conference and another in the Second Asian Conference on Cultural Studies.

He availed the First President Manuel Roxas and Sanag 2010 Literary Fellowships. In 2010, Lucell got a research grant from the NCCA on the fine artists of Panay. He had two solo visual arts exhibits at Museo Negrense and UP Art Gallery and served as trainer of Artist for Crisis Program of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts.

Since two years ago, he had conducted visual arts training for the indigenous people and the youths at Rizal street and has managed their visual arts festivals through the Kalinawa Art Foundation (Makati-based) and the Pagtubo sa Kasanag.

Lucell regularly writes a column in The Daily Guardian, a daily in Western Visayas.

In sculpture, Lucell has two semi-finalist awards in the Metrobank Art and Design Excellence. He is a member of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts-National Committee on Visual Arts.

Tradition and Innovation from a Central Philippine University Artist’s “Paint of View”

By Lucell Larawan

Central Philippine University Blog

Among the highlights of the national arts month is the Philippine Visual Arts Festival: The Rizal Experience (PIVAF: TRE) at Angono, Rizal.

This is the main event for sculptors, painters and cultural workers. I am among the five delegates in Panay, representing Iloilo.

My painting entry entitled “Kambal na Tradisyon at Inobasyon Tungo sa mas Matibay na Pagkakakilanlan” is my interpretation of this year’s theme. It shows that both tradition and innovation are Siamese twins where one animates the other.

Tradition is the treasure trove of indigenous wisdom, without which communities cannot establish a unique identity that they can call their own. Innovations are indications of growth needed for a stronger and more mature culture.

Cultures doe not have to stagnate; they should soar. As they evolve, people should have a stronger identity needed for a better sense of pride. Such sense of pride is mediated by an intervening variable—symbols of excellence.

People who develop a better sense of pride are liberated from a psychic malady called Doña Victorina syndrome or self-contempt (common among Filipinos) and become more prepared as building blocks of national development.

My painting shown here is more particular about the Iloilo milieu. Some reminisce our Carabao-Carroza festival, Pinta Paraw and the distant past where the barter of Panay used the salakot medium. We can also take pride of original inventions by two Central Philippine University professors: the single-burner rice husk stove of Alexis Belonio and the pellet mill by Jaime Cabarles and associates.

In a state of flux, our culture continually establishes a stronger distinction developing among the Filipino subcultures.

The approach used as I limned this in acrylic is a synthesis of modern styles. The composition embraces the tradition of breaking traditions when it comes to canons of art making.
_________________________

ABOUT LUCELL LARAWAN

Central Philippine University Blog

Lucell Larawan is an Associate Professor of the Department of Business Administration, Central Philippine University. As a prolific researcher, he completed eight single-authored researches on business and management, and art.

He presented papers in the “International Conference on Business and Management” in Turkey (April 15-17, 2011) and the “First International Conference on Visayan Art and Culture” (SM Trade Center, Cebu City, 2010).

Lucell will be presenting two papers in June 2012, one in the UP National College of Public Administration and Governance International Conference and another in the Second Asian Conference on Cultural Studies.

He availed the First President Manuel Roxas and Sanag 2010 Literary Fellowships. In 2010, Lucell got a research grant from the NCCA on the fine artists of Panay. He had two solo visual arts exhibits at Museo Negrense and UP Art Gallery and served as trainer of Artist for Crisis Program of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts.

Since two years ago, he had conducted visual arts training for the indigenous people and the youths at Rizal street and has managed their visual arts festivals through the Kalinawa Art Foundation (Makati-based) and the Pagtubo sa Kasanag.

Lucell regularly writes a column in The Daily Guardian, a daily in Western Visayas.

In sculpture, Lucell has two semi-finalist awards in the Metrobank Art and Design Excellence. He is a member of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts-National Committee on Visual Arts.

Frank C. Jamandre – The Bagong Bayani Awardee for Community Service is a Centralian

Central Philippine University Blog

Frank C. Jamandre, native of Iloilo, is recipient of the 2011 Bagong Bayani Award for Community Service.

Frank finished his Nursing degree in 1973 at Central Philippine University. At present, he is the regulatory and accreditation coordinator at Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar.

President Benigno Aquino III will give the award on December 1 at the Malacañang Palace.

Responding to CPU Blog’s email interview, Frank shared the answers that come from his heart.

Frank believes that the three qualities that lead to his being chosen as Bagong Bayani Awardee for Community Service are:

  1. Love of GOD. Putting HIM first in my life.
  2. Love in helping the less fortunate.
  3. Love for my country to be economically stable and free of corruption, have fear of God and follow the righteous way.

Asked how CPU as his college Alma Mater influenced his life, Frank Jamandresaid, “CPU molded me in Christian values that made me a vessel to spread God’s goodness and love to all men.”

Frank challenged Centralians to continue to spread the love of GOD and let our lives shine, being the light of this World so others will see the goodness God has in our lives.

Congratulations Frank C. Jamandre! You bring honor to Central Philippine University. Mabuhay!

Please read this news item from SUN STAR ILOILO

Central Philippine University Blog

Manny Pacquiao vs. Juan Manuel Marquez – Australia Centralians raise funds for 7th CPUAA Global Reunion

Central Philippine University Blog

While Manny Pacquiao is getting ready, doing his daily boxing routines for the upcoming Nov. 12 fight against Juan Manuel Marquez, Centralians at Sydney are also preparing for their fund raising event through the Pacquiao-Marquez fight.

On 9-11 September 2012, the CPU Alumni Association – Australia Chapter will host the CPUAA 7th Global Reunion. The event will be held at Sydney, Australia. CPUAA – Australia Chapter is preparing actively for the CPUAA 7th Global Reunion at Sydney.

Led by CPUAA – Australia Chapter President Ismael Isidto, the group had already arranged the venues and accommodation for Centralians coming from the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Europe, Middle East, Asia, and other parts of the world.

Realizing the fund raising potential of a Manny Pacquiao fight, the CPUAA – Australia Chapter organized the live streaming of the Manny Pacquiao vs. Juan Manuel Marquez III on November 12 for Centralians and friends.

On the Sydney 2012 CPUAA 7th Global Reunion Facebook Group’s Wall CPUAA – Australia Chapter President Ismael Isidto announces:

“For the amount of $30/person, there will be a good variety of food which the group will cater for the guests who are going to watch the fight and overflowing FREE drinks will, likewise, be provided. T-shirts printed with Manny Pacquiao’s images will be printed and sold before and during the fight with a price tag of $30 apiece. Imported and made to order pa ang mga shirts amo na nga medyo mahal. In the same token, promotional T-shirts of the Wicked Cybercafe group led by our VP, Val Centeno, will be on sale with profits going to our Association’s coffers.”

Central Philippine University Blog

Feeling the enthusiasm and cooperation that officers and members of the CPUAA – Australia Chapter are showing for the CPUAA 7th Global Reunion, there’s no doubt that after the Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez fight on November 12, there will be two champions.

No, I’m not looking forward to another draw between Pacquiao and Marquez. I am confident that Manny Pacquiao will win again and defeat Juan Manuel Marquez. With Pacquiao’s victory comes the victory of the Central Spirit.

Congratulations CPUAA – Australia Chapter for keeping the Central Spirit aflame to the world in Sydney for the CPUAA 7th Global Reunion and beyond.

Central Philippine University Blog

Meanwhile, let’s take a look at the Pacquiao vs. Marquez III trailer.

Central Philippine University – Find Her in This Video…



Is Central Philippine University an excellent university in Iloilo City?

Is Central Philippine University still an Iloilo City tourist destination?

I can’t help asking these questions after watching the “Livable Iloilo City” video several times trying to find any image of Central Philippine University.

Sad to note, there is none.

How could the producers miss taking footage of Central Philippine University, a University with more than 12,000 students?

Currently, the first and only university in the Philippines that is offering the B.S. Health, Fitness, Lifestyle Management and B.S. Packaging Engineering courses.

Maybe the producers went out looking for sponsors, invited CPU but maybe CPU did not respond positively for lack of budget?

Well, let me find some answers… meanwhile let me pray… God save Central Philippine University!

Share your thoughts by posting a comment. Thank you!