Archive | In Focus RSS for this section

Open Letter to CPU President Robles from Concerned Alumnus

We picked up from The Good Old Days at CPU Facebook Page the letter that Dr. Lester Edwin J. Ruiz wrote to CPU President Teodoro Robles.

Please read the full text of the letter below:

June 9, 2014

Dear President Robles,

I trust this email to you, only my third in the past five or six years, finds you well and in good health.

Allow me to comment directly on the brief exchange between Ms. St. Denis and yourself regarding the CPU “chicken project” in Leon. I thought myself that Ms. St. Denis’ question on Facebook was pretty clear, she seemed to be asking about the transparency that a university—any university that is genuinely concerned about all its constituencies—should exercise towards its constituencies, including its alumni/ae. Many of us are familiar with the university’s obligation to be accountable to the Philippine government. Some of us work with national and international donor agencies, as well as government-recognized accrediting agencies. So we know that a certain kind of accountability is required in order to receive project funding.

But, the question, Mr. President, is less about accountability to government, and much more about the transparency and accountability towards alumni/ae—and to the internal constituencies of the university (i.e., faculty, administration, students). I believe we deserve the courtesy of a substantive response.

I myself welcome your invitation to seek the truth. Your offer to make the university’s internal records available to anyone who is seeking the truth is encouraging. Your invitation to alumni/ae to visit and to see for themselves what is going on is re-assuring. Where documentary evidence is concerned, we all know that alumni/ae for the longest time have already asked for these records, not only with regard to the “chicken” project, but also in other areas of university life, for example, student scholarships, infrastructure projects, and others. Sadly, none to my knowledge have been forthcoming. This is an old refrain that sometimes sounds like a broken record. But, you know as well as I that this constant request for information is part of the structure and process of transparency, accountability, and good governance. What I have seen thus far have been largely public relations reports: what I call “narrative evidence” (or “stories” from administration). The question, however, is about “documentary evidence,” maybe even “statutory evidence,” that describes the structure, process, and criteria by which the university undertakes, implements, and demonstrates its conformity not only to the legal requirements of government, but also the desirable expectations of good governance, including what mechanisms of independent accounting, audit, budget, and control are used and their results.

If the only reports we as alumni/ae deserve are the ones the university has released thus far, then so be it. But please, do not invite us to seek the truth, and not provide us with what is needed to arrive at that truth, including the free exchange of information and ideas, the right and obligation to ask difficult questions—without censure or insult, and the unqualified welcome of alumni/ae who request such information (some even visit CPU and you).

Facebook, for me, is not, in the first instance, a source of data or information. It is a “weather station” that indicates how the (social, political, institutional) winds are blowing, reflecting the sentiments of part of the university’s constituencies. I may or may not believe what I read on Facebook. But I take seriously what it reflects, namely, a deep concern by some alumni/ae regarding the way the university is being run. I work with 270 seminaries, divinity schools, and graduate schools of theology in the US and Canada; and probably tens of hundreds more in other parts of the world. So, I have a little bit of understanding of the challenges universities face with regard to its constituencies. In fact, whether you believe it or not, I can appreciate the challenges you face, including the frustration that comes with what feels is endless, unwarranted, even uninformed, criticism. At the same time, Mr. President, these alumni/ae are only exercising their care and concern for their Alma Mater. I believe they deserve a much deeper and broader response than what I have seen thus far.

I myself wrote you several emails in the past few years but never got a response from you. Maybe, these emails did not reach you; or maybe, you chose to ignore them. I really don’t know. And frankly speaking, there is a sense in which it does not matter if you respond or not. Truth be told, I don’t hold it against you; nor did I expect a response. But the other alumni/ae, such as those on FB are expecting their questions to be addressed directly and explicitly by you or by your duly appointed representatives. And while you may think that you have done that, the fact that they have kept asking—in all kinds of fora, including Facebook—means, their questions have yet to be fully answered. This probably means, your alumni/ae office needs to review how effective it is engaging its constituencies.

So why do I write now, and why publicly? There are several reasons. First, because I hope that should you wish to respond, as you did in the case of Ms. St. Denis, you would do so publicly. Second, because I am one of those who has been asking the university for transparency and accountability—not just from the office of the president, but from the entire university; and not just in the case of the “chicken” project, or the Nelson Diesto suspension, or student scholarships, but in all areas of the university’s life and work. More important, this insistence on transparency and accountability is not just for their own sake, but for the sake of institutional vitality and educational effectiveness. The mission of CPU demands a commitment to quality assurance and improvement, or in my language, to transformation: the “creation of the fundamentally new that is also fundamentally better.” And in this, all constituencies have a part to play, and therefore, need to be in the conversation.

Mine is not a new concern; it has been a longstanding one. And it feels that there has been uneven movement in the area of transparency, accountability and transformation in relation to alumni/ae. Let me be very clear, Mr. President. I am not blaming or accusing you for not doing your job. A university president’s performance review is the proper venue and obligation of the Board of Trustees—not of alumni/ae on Facebook. What I am saying, however, is that these important exchanges, even criticism, is part of our “life together” as Centralians, as members of civil society, and as sisters and brothers in the commonwealth of God—and in these public spaces, the winds are blowing, and they will continue to blow, perhaps even harder, until they are met with candor and compassion, understanding and grace—which is part of the exercise of true leadership and Christian discipleship.

Thank you for your service to CPU. I hope for better days.

Yours sincerely,

Lester Edwin J. Ruiz, PhD
HS Class 1971
2012-2013 Visiting Associate Professor
College of Theology
Central Philippine University

CLICK to read the CPU President’s response

Advertisements

Centralian invented Solar Night Light being used in typhoon-stricken areas

Solar Night Light by Silverio Navarro Jr.
Solar Night Light

SILVERIO T. NAVARRO JR.

Silver says:

It’s heart warming when I saw my invention being used to light up areas hit by Yolanda. Thanks to Shelter Foundation and TESDA for helping spread this technology.

It only started as a design challenge to light up at night the bottles on the roof that were promoted by Illac Diaz.

The design had to be simple using locally available parts and the device can be easily fabricated and repaired by local people.

After building the first prototypes, the interest to replicate this just spread like wildfire. Please sponsor the dissemination of the solar LED lamps to light up more lives. This is my contribution to humanity, galing sa Pinoy para sa mundo (from Filipinos for the world).

SOURCE: Facebook Wall of Silverio T. Navarro Jr.


Engr. Silverio T. Navarro Jr. graduated Electrical Engineering at CPU in 1989. During his student days, he designed the electronic bell of Central Philippine University that plays the Alma Mater song to signal the start/end of every class period.


For readers who might search in the Internet and read the article about the Solar Night Light being attributed to University of Sto. Tomas engineering students, here’s what Silver said:

“I taught the UST students how to build the solar LED lamps with an instruction manual and guided them to talk to TESDA to promote this nationwide. There are several parties claiming who started this but they know it was yours truly who designed and built the first prototype. It’s self glorification to fight for this claim, so I focus more in helping others benefit from this technology. Others will use this for financial gains with selfish ends, so be warned.”


Send your help now! Join the Hopevale Trust in helping the Philippines.

CLICK on the link below for details on how you may send your donations:

LET US HELP THE PHILIPPINES


 

"Nanding" – Your Life Inspires Me

The Escuban Family

Your life inspires me. Your story of despair and hope; of struggle for a living and freedom from poverty; of lack of a school education and a wealth of life’s education – they nourished me; they educated me, and; they brought me to where I am now.

I am Rinand because of you and Nanay. God used both of you to give me a life with so much confidence looking to the future with limitless possibilities.

You are a man of ambition. That is the reason why for many a times those who do not know your heart and mind, laughed at and ridiculed you, for how can a man so downtrodden and downcast and without an iota of academic learning dream so big to reach for his impossible stars.

But deep in your heart, you know that God created you to live a life of meaning and purpose. And so, smiling at those who gave you up for nothing, you and God walked together through tough and hopeless times, slowly and with agony, until you reached and took hold of your stars.

Your beginnings were miserable and undesirable. You stared poverty right on her face. You ate not on a table with a silver spoon and a plate but, sat on your buttocks and devoured your food from a banana leaf with your bare calloused hands. You slept not in a bed of comfort but stretched your battered body on a cold surface of clay. “This man has no future in him”, they said and judged you then.

But you are a dreamer. Gifted by God with a discerning mind; an articulate tongue, and; a heart brimming with courage and hope, you dreamed to fight and slay the demons of your poverty.

Blessed with a body toughened by years of hardship and endowed with a strength honed through life’s daily grind, you picked-up yourself to explore the world.

Hardened by the sugarcane fields of La Carlota, you crossed the seas to Iloilo and later to Zamboanga, to become an experienced and a tough stevedore hand; a highway construction worker; politicians bodyguard, and a church building caretaker. You went where the wind took you for a chance at a better life.

Without a formal education, you daringly entered the gates of a University, joined the Gospel Team and courted a lady of simplicity and dignity and respect who became your wife and taught you your “A,B,Cs” and she I now call, my “Nanay”.

Without access to books penned by scholars and the learned, you read and meditated on the Holy Bible which became your source of wisdom and enlightenment, satisfied your intellectual curiosity and fed your soul.

Without a degree to embellish your name, you worked night and day and offered your body to be scorched by the sun and drenched by the rain just to feed your family and send Nanay and your four growing children to one of the finest universities.

That was then.

Now, you smile at your detractors and testify in your words, “Dalayawon guid ang Gino-o. Indi ini iya tikal. Wala ako sang tinun-an apang naka-tapos ang akon pinalangga nga asawa kag apat ka mga kabataan, sa CPU pa! Wala ako gina-kaptan nga titulo apang sa grasya sang Diyos ang akon asawa kag mga kabataan puro may mga kurso kag, may doctor, engineer, pastor, kag nurse ako nga mga umagad. Ano pa nga titulo ang pangita-on ko?”

When I read the story of your life, I still wonder, “How can a man of the earth, encircled by overwhelming obstacles fought through the maze and came out a victor?”

Given what you have experienced, even a day of it, I wonder how I could survive. You amaze me Tatay as much as you bless me.

You have finally slain the demons of your poverty, together with Nanay’s help. And, we your children, Inday Rina Joy, Boboy Andrew, Nonoy Harold, and myself have tasted the sweetness of the fruit of your conquest

Tatay, today you turn 80 and you are healthy, prays and reads your Bible everyday. You are not perfect like everyone. You have your weaknesses and limitations.

But you are a hard and a rough stone smoothened and fashioned by the hands of God to become a precious shining gem.

Thank you Tatay. I love you so much. God bless you.

HAPPY 80th BIRTHDAY.

Your son,

Toto Rinand, with Inday Lory Joy, Toto Brahms, Nonoy Strauss and Tata Handel

NOTE: This letter is published with permission from Mr. Rinand Escuban.

“Nanding” – Your Life Inspires Me

The Escuban Family

Your life inspires me. Your story of despair and hope; of struggle for a living and freedom from poverty; of lack of a school education and a wealth of life’s education – they nourished me; they educated me, and; they brought me to where I am now.

I am Rinand because of you and Nanay. God used both of you to give me a life with so much confidence looking to the future with limitless possibilities.

You are a man of ambition. That is the reason why for many a times those who do not know your heart and mind, laughed at and ridiculed you, for how can a man so downtrodden and downcast and without an iota of academic learning dream so big to reach for his impossible stars.

But deep in your heart, you know that God created you to live a life of meaning and purpose. And so, smiling at those who gave you up for nothing, you and God walked together through tough and hopeless times, slowly and with agony, until you reached and took hold of your stars.

Your beginnings were miserable and undesirable. You stared poverty right on her face. You ate not on a table with a silver spoon and a plate but, sat on your buttocks and devoured your food from a banana leaf with your bare calloused hands. You slept not in a bed of comfort but stretched your battered body on a cold surface of clay. “This man has no future in him”, they said and judged you then.

But you are a dreamer. Gifted by God with a discerning mind; an articulate tongue, and; a heart brimming with courage and hope, you dreamed to fight and slay the demons of your poverty.

Blessed with a body toughened by years of hardship and endowed with a strength honed through life’s daily grind, you picked-up yourself to explore the world.

Hardened by the sugarcane fields of La Carlota, you crossed the seas to Iloilo and later to Zamboanga, to become an experienced and a tough stevedore hand; a highway construction worker; politicians bodyguard, and a church building caretaker. You went where the wind took you for a chance at a better life.

Without a formal education, you daringly entered the gates of a University, joined the Gospel Team and courted a lady of simplicity and dignity and respect who became your wife and taught you your “A,B,Cs” and she I now call, my “Nanay”.

Without access to books penned by scholars and the learned, you read and meditated on the Holy Bible which became your source of wisdom and enlightenment, satisfied your intellectual curiosity and fed your soul.

Without a degree to embellish your name, you worked night and day and offered your body to be scorched by the sun and drenched by the rain just to feed your family and send Nanay and your four growing children to one of the finest universities.

That was then.

Now, you smile at your detractors and testify in your words, “Dalayawon guid ang Gino-o. Indi ini iya tikal. Wala ako sang tinun-an apang naka-tapos ang akon pinalangga nga asawa kag apat ka mga kabataan, sa CPU pa! Wala ako gina-kaptan nga titulo apang sa grasya sang Diyos ang akon asawa kag mga kabataan puro may mga kurso kag, may doctor, engineer, pastor, kag nurse ako nga mga umagad. Ano pa nga titulo ang pangita-on ko?”

When I read the story of your life, I still wonder, “How can a man of the earth, encircled by overwhelming obstacles fought through the maze and came out a victor?”

Given what you have experienced, even a day of it, I wonder how I could survive. You amaze me Tatay as much as you bless me.

You have finally slain the demons of your poverty, together with Nanay’s help. And, we your children, Inday Rina Joy, Boboy Andrew, Nonoy Harold, and myself have tasted the sweetness of the fruit of your conquest

Tatay, today you turn 80 and you are healthy, prays and reads your Bible everyday. You are not perfect like everyone. You have your weaknesses and limitations.

But you are a hard and a rough stone smoothened and fashioned by the hands of God to become a precious shining gem.

Thank you Tatay. I love you so much. God bless you.

HAPPY 80th BIRTHDAY.

Your son,

Toto Rinand, with Inday Lory Joy, Toto Brahms, Nonoy Strauss and Tata Handel

NOTE: This letter is published with permission from Mr. Rinand Escuban.

Famous Sites in Europe through Karl Hipolito’s Great Photo Shots

Prague, Czech Republic

Bavaria, Germany

Brussels, Belgium

West London, England

London, England

 

Karl Hipolito says:

Recently, blue hour photography or what they call the dusk/dawn photography has caught my amazement, making me chase and catch that time when it’s neither full daylight nor complete darkness.

Recalling my Europe photography trip, it was funny that we all have to run around Rome just to get the best shot of the Colosseum in the blue hour.

This best time of the day doesn’t last long. You have to equip yourself with a good pair of running shoes and good camera backpack to aid you in catching the best hour in photography.

Usually in my photos, I always adopt 4 of the Top 10 tips I have learned from Kodak. Move it from the middle; move in close; take some vertical shots; and watch the light. The rest would be by mood.

When I travel, I meet people with different perspectives in photography. I learned from fellows who carry big camera gears to the smallest point and shoot ones that it’s not about what you have but how you frame it through your lens.

I agree with Yen Baet, National Geographic Exceptional Experiences Photo Contest 2011 Winner, that:

“Some people tend to forget that owning a camera doesn’t make one a photographer. It is merely a tool, and to make that tool serve its purpose fully, you have to have the eye and a vision. Add in a generous amount of passion, dedication and belief in yourself, that is what makes the difference.”

I still look forward to future globe-trotting opportunities as these open my eyes and my lens to how God created the world superbly.

Let’s Tour Europe through Karl Hipolito’s Photos

On March 28, Engr. Karl Hipolito went on a photography excursion to Europe.

Following Karl’s journey through his photographs makes me feel like I am also travelling through Europe too.

His pictures seem so real as if you were there in that moment when he tool the shot.

CPU Blog is happy to share Karl’s photographs of famous sites in each country he visited. You will surely enjoy seeing the European sites through his photographs.

Paris, France

Lucerne & Lugano – Switzerland

Rome, Italy

Florence, Italy

Venice, Italy

Vienna, Austria

TO BE CONTINUED…

See the rest of Karl’s European journey in our next post!

Interview with Mr. Loven Ramos, Artist by Philippine President’s Media Team

Loven Ramos says on Facebook (4 April 2012):

“I am missing the chance to meet President Aquino in Phnom Penh today because 1.) 11 professors from my university are staying with us today at the hotel 2.) I have way too much work for the opening of our new exhibition on Friday, Khmer Revelry, at 1961 and also the Woven Words Poetry Workshop with Luis Batchoy on Saturday. 3.) I am running seriously low on funds for all the traveling we’ve been doing to Phnom Penh!

So instead of sulking for the missed opportunity, I am thanking the heavens for a chance to be interviewed by the president’s media team as one of the featured Filipinos in Cambodia… (thanks Léon Franco for the link!)”

ABOUT LOVEN RAMOS

Loven Ramos is a Centralian visual poet who moved to Cambodia in 2005 as a graphic designer for a local hotel. Six months to his contract, he received calls from other hotels and institutions to help them with their design work as well. Realizing the potential of the business, he quit his job and opened his first venture in Cambodia – a design and photography studio called Spoolworks.

Now able to balance his commercial work with his passion for the arts, he was able to work on his series of artworks about Cambodian monks which led him to exhibitions all over Cambodia, the Philippines and Singapore. The same series of artworks also got him an invitation to represent the Philippines and Cambodia in the 2008 Beijing Olympics Global Art Exhibition.

His passion for the arts and design enabled him to open several businesses and projects like Poetry, ArtDeli, the One Shop, Hotel 1961 (all in Siem Reap) and recently, the ARTillery in Phnom Penh. The Phnom Penh Post recently called him one of the kingdom’s most dynamic, young “ART-repreneurs”, always bringing art to the core of his business endeavors.

Loven also does photographic tours and historical tours of Angkor on a regular basis, and he has led these tours to prominent celebrities and government officials like Senator Loren Legarda, Senator Piya Cayetano, and business tycoon Ben Chan.

Loven is still based in Siem Reap with his wife Faith, also a Centralian and his son Freedom.

BUSINESS VENTURES / PROJECTS:

SPOOLWORKS

CPU Blog

A photography and design studio established in 2005

  • As a designer, Loven has handled design and brand management for major companies in Cambodia and worldwide such as Raffles Hotels, Sofitel, Aman Resorts (Indonesia), Orient Express, Voyageurs sans Bagage (France), 2BU ad agency (Australia) and Xyclo (USA)
  • As a photographer, Loven has been the photographer to official state visits and events for the following leaders and celebrities: HRH Queen Sofia of Spain, President Ruth Dreyfuss of Switzerland, Princess Maha Chakri of Thailand, and pop star Ricky Martin.

POETRY

A clothing and lifestyle store opened in 2009

  • Featured in the Philippine Star and Garage Magazine

ARTDELI

cpu blog

An art gallery and cafe opened in 2010

  • Featured in publications like Travel+Leisure, DestinAsian,

 
 
 
HOTEL 1961

Central Philippine University Blog

An art hotel and gallery dedicated to the 1960’s opened in 2011

  • Featured in a short documentary on Canada’s Evasion TV Channel
  • Featured in a documentary on travel to Southeast Asia in GMA 7’s I-Witness Program
  • Featured in CNN’s Go.

ANGKOR ART EXPLO

The first bi-yearly art festival in Angkor and Battambang started in 2011, next one is in January 2013

  • Brought in 5 artists from the Philippines to co-exhibit with 30 other artists from Cambodia and all over the world
  • Established the “Art in the Countryside” program through a 200 km journey on art bicycles

ARTILLERY

A café, boutique and art gallery opened in 2012

 

Know more about Loven Ramos and his works at http://www.lovenramos.com/

Central Philippine University Blog is proud of you. Your works and achievements are inspiration to us. God bless you and your family!

Interview with Mr. Loven Ramos, Artist by Philippine President's Media Team

Loven Ramos says on Facebook (4 April 2012):

“I am missing the chance to meet President Aquino in Phnom Penh today because 1.) 11 professors from my university are staying with us today at the hotel 2.) I have way too much work for the opening of our new exhibition on Friday, Khmer Revelry, at 1961 and also the Woven Words Poetry Workshop with Luis Batchoy on Saturday. 3.) I am running seriously low on funds for all the traveling we’ve been doing to Phnom Penh!

So instead of sulking for the missed opportunity, I am thanking the heavens for a chance to be interviewed by the president’s media team as one of the featured Filipinos in Cambodia… (thanks Léon Franco for the link!)”

ABOUT LOVEN RAMOS

Loven Ramos is a Centralian visual poet who moved to Cambodia in 2005 as a graphic designer for a local hotel. Six months to his contract, he received calls from other hotels and institutions to help them with their design work as well. Realizing the potential of the business, he quit his job and opened his first venture in Cambodia – a design and photography studio called Spoolworks.

Now able to balance his commercial work with his passion for the arts, he was able to work on his series of artworks about Cambodian monks which led him to exhibitions all over Cambodia, the Philippines and Singapore. The same series of artworks also got him an invitation to represent the Philippines and Cambodia in the 2008 Beijing Olympics Global Art Exhibition.

His passion for the arts and design enabled him to open several businesses and projects like Poetry, ArtDeli, the One Shop, Hotel 1961 (all in Siem Reap) and recently, the ARTillery in Phnom Penh. The Phnom Penh Post recently called him one of the kingdom’s most dynamic, young “ART-repreneurs”, always bringing art to the core of his business endeavors.

Loven also does photographic tours and historical tours of Angkor on a regular basis, and he has led these tours to prominent celebrities and government officials like Senator Loren Legarda, Senator Piya Cayetano, and business tycoon Ben Chan.

Loven is still based in Siem Reap with his wife Faith, also a Centralian and his son Freedom.

BUSINESS VENTURES / PROJECTS:

SPOOLWORKS

CPU Blog

A photography and design studio established in 2005

  • As a designer, Loven has handled design and brand management for major companies in Cambodia and worldwide such as Raffles Hotels, Sofitel, Aman Resorts (Indonesia), Orient Express, Voyageurs sans Bagage (France), 2BU ad agency (Australia) and Xyclo (USA)
  • As a photographer, Loven has been the photographer to official state visits and events for the following leaders and celebrities: HRH Queen Sofia of Spain, President Ruth Dreyfuss of Switzerland, Princess Maha Chakri of Thailand, and pop star Ricky Martin.

POETRY

A clothing and lifestyle store opened in 2009

  • Featured in the Philippine Star and Garage Magazine

ARTDELI

cpu blog

An art gallery and cafe opened in 2010

  • Featured in publications like Travel+Leisure, DestinAsian,

 
 
 
HOTEL 1961

Central Philippine University Blog

An art hotel and gallery dedicated to the 1960’s opened in 2011

  • Featured in a short documentary on Canada’s Evasion TV Channel
  • Featured in a documentary on travel to Southeast Asia in GMA 7’s I-Witness Program
  • Featured in CNN’s Go.

ANGKOR ART EXPLO

The first bi-yearly art festival in Angkor and Battambang started in 2011, next one is in January 2013

  • Brought in 5 artists from the Philippines to co-exhibit with 30 other artists from Cambodia and all over the world
  • Established the “Art in the Countryside” program through a 200 km journey on art bicycles

ARTILLERY

A café, boutique and art gallery opened in 2012

 

Know more about Loven Ramos and his works at http://www.lovenramos.com/

Central Philippine University Blog is proud of you. Your works and achievements are inspiration to us. God bless you and your family!

Central Philippine University Alumnus’ Photos Featured in Yahoo NZ

We take pride and honour in featuring the photographs of Engr. Karl Hipolito that Yahoo NZ featured in Yahoo NZ Total Travel Destination of the Month: Coromandel.

See Karl’s photos and captions of Coromandel.

You will find the Coromandel Peninsula as you travel in the North Island of New Zealand. The peninsula is located in the Waikato Region and Thames-Coromandel District and stretches 85 kilometres north from the western end of the Bay of Plenty. Its shape forms a natural barrier to protect the Hauraki Gulf and Firth of Thames from the tempest of the Pacific Ocean.

The Coromandel Peninsula lies in the North Island of New Zealand. It is part of the Waikato Region and Thames-Coromandel District and extends 85 kilometres north from the western end of the Bay of Plenty, forming a natural barrier to protect the Hauraki G
The Coromandel Peninsula lies in the North Island of New Zealand. It is part of the Waikato Region and Thames-Coromandel District and extends 85 kilometres north from the western end of the Bay of Plenty, forming a natural barrier to protect the Hauraki G
The Coromandel Peninsula lies in the North Island of New Zealand. It is part of the Waikato Region and Thames-Coromandel District and extends 85 kilometres north from the western end of the Bay of Plenty, forming a natural barrier to protect the Hauraki G

Cathedral Cove and surrounding area are very popular among local and international tourists. Approximately 150,000 visitors come to this place each year. Probably, the fact that some shots for Chronicles of Narnia were taken made the place more popular.

Cathedral Cove is named after the cave located there linking Mare’s Leg Cove to Cathedral Cove. The area is very popular with tourists, and receives around 150,000 visitors a year. This is where some shots for Chronicles of Narnia were taken.

Stingray Bay

Stingray Bay. The Coromandel Peninsula lies in the North Island of New Zealand. It is part of the Waikato Region and Thames-Coromandel District and extends 85 kilometres north from the western end of the Bay of Plenty, forming a natural barrier to protect
Stingray Bay. The Coromandel Peninsula lies in the North Island of New Zealand. It is part of the Waikato Region and Thames-Coromandel District and extends 85 kilometres north from the western end of the Bay of Plenty, forming a natural barrier to protect

ABOUT ENGR. KARL HIPOLITO

Karl graduated Bachelor of Science in Electronics and Communications Engineering in 2000. He passed the BSECE board in 2001.

He received the loyalty award for studying at CPU in Kindergarten, Elementary (1991), High School (1995) and college.

He is working currently in one of the IT industries in Auckland. Prior to migrating to New Zealand, he worked in Manila for three years and a year in Singapore .

Karl told CPU Blog:

“In my past time, photography is my stress reliever. I love traveling in and outside New Zealand to capture the wonders of the world through my lens. I find completeness when people appreciate my work. In fact, come March 28, I am scheduled to fly to Europe to snap more and more sights to share to the world.”

“Getty Images have also considered some of my photos for selling and licencing them globally. I am so ecstatic and inspired to share more as my photographs are being recognized internationally. Not only I am proud of my works but so happy to make my fellowmen proud too.”

Your Alma Mater, Central Philippine University is surely proud of what you have achieved.

See more photos of Engr. Karl Hipolito at Karl Hipolito’s Photostream.

CPU Derecho… Sakay Na!

Central Philippine University Blog

The CPU Derecho hosts. (L-R) Eric Lagradilla, Carmelle Frances Romero, Katherine Joyce Somosierra, Jason Pagunsan, Jonan Castillon, and Kim de la Cruz

Yes…it is more than the oldest and famous “CPU Derecho” jeepney route. It’s a wake up call to all Centralians and Ilonggos!

CPU Derecho, the newest morning talk show on the CPU Alumni Channel, is a 30-minute TV Program conceptualized a year ago by the staff members of the CPU Office of the President and the Publication and Information Center.

The President posed a challenge to come up with alternative shows on the CPU Alumni Channel. CPU Derecho, with its vibrant, dynamic concept was a sure go!

CPU Derecho aims to present the many facets of Centralian life and uphold its vision and mission as well. The show had her maiden showing on May 7, 2007 with pioneer hosts, Carmelle Frances Romero, Katherine Joyce Somosierra, Jason Pagunsan, Eric Lagradilla, and Jonan Castillon.

It features interviews of famous personalities, now and then, and interesting stories in and off campus. In our second episode, we had Dr. Agustin Pulido, ex- CPU President, and now Vice Chairperson of the BOT as guest. On the Monday showing, Pres. Juanito Acanto takes time to greet the CPU constituents, set the campus into his smiling mode signature.

There is also a segment of history and trivia by Jason Pagunsan where refreshing historical information for the week is told. Eric Lagradilla, the President’s legal aide seeks to present matters and extend assistance on student’s or employee’s legal concerns.

Short documentaries of Centralian interests are also shown. On the first show, a power-point presentation of the existing benches around the campus was shown along with interesting background information. It was entitled “CPUR Benches” for these nostalgic items were projects of the CPU Republic.

You should have seen the “Poste”, a power-point presentation on the evolution of electric posts in the campus from wooden to concrete as being parallel to development and technological change.

The first off-campus video feature was the “CPU Zarraga Farm”. Except for Agriculture students, most Centralians just heard about the farm but had never been there. The team visited the place, featured different farm activities, and interviewed the caretaker.

The informative video feature showed the farm’s potential for an eco-tourism site. The farm is worth visiting and alumni who come to CPU should include Zarraga farm in their itinerary. These and all other interesting stories are featured in the show’s segments.

Towards the end of the show, the hosts announce memorandums, meeting schedules, and other events of the week are announced.

Sandy Lim, Maricar Caballero, Kristen Jor are the work students in the President’s Office who assist in the production with Noel Christian Romero as lead production assistant.

Pastor Kim De la Cruz, Assistant to the President for Kid’s Central Program, helps in directing the show. For off-campus video recording, Mr. Ceciro Omero II is the volunteer videographer.

Because “CPU Derecho was coined from the famous “Jaro CPU Derecho” jeepney route, the hosts invite the TV viewers to “sakay na” and ends with the phrase “sa lugar lang” when they open and end the show, respectively.

Watch out for more live campus coverage and feature stories.

CPU Derecho is being shown live every Monday and Friday at 7:45 A.M. on Sky Cable’s, Channel 8, CPU Alumni Channel, with replays on Wednesdays-7:45 AM and Sundays-7:00 AM.

ADMIN’S NOTE:

Katherine Joyce Somosierra wrote this press release published in Panay Panays May 2007. We re-published this write up her for recollection purposes. Also, so that alumni will know that once upon a time in CPU, a 30-minute TV program existed. CPU Derecho stopped airing in mid-2009, when the people behind the production became busy with their respective duties and responsibilities at Central Philippine University.